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RULES OF THE ROAD

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#1
I Thought I would post this for the boating guys and for those that will one day own a boat. since it became law for all category R boat owners to have a skippers ticket, I have to say I am still amazed at how many chaps that have the qualifications but still don't know the rules of the road. I have witnessed quite a few incidents and have also been asked quite a few questions about the rules of the road by so called qualified skippers.
Is it because we are so consumed in getting the bare necessities to take a boat out fishing or are we actually concerned about our own and fellow anglers safety?
many anglers have the ticket but does this mean they know what to do in a certain circumstance? see this post in bassmaster magazine

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#2
Not to be funny or anything but I can bearly remember what I had for dinner last night, let alone remember what I learnt doing my skippers 4 years ago, but a little common sense goes a long way :blue-biggrin:
Edit your signature here ... <a href="http://www.bassfishing.co.za/bassingnews/ucp.php?i=profile&mode=signature">Edit</a>
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#3
Greetings and salutations from a hot and humid Tanzania.

In this place, there are no rules of the road....but back to topic

Generally, in the smaller boat communities there is no issues barring missing no wake zones. Up in Jhb where you have to contend with 100 boats at a comp, coupled with jet ski's, wake boats and ski boats its a problem.
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#4
Hi Brenden,
Regarding ' The Rules Of The Road' for boating as indicated by your self it is important to understand this term ' The Rules Of The Road' should not be used in a S.A. context when relating to our R boating skippers ticket as this will definately end up in one big bugger- up this term is used in the states and so on because they keep 'Right' Be careful Just remember anti clock wise always!
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#5
KingDon Wrote:Hi Brenden,
Regarding ' The Rules Of The Road' for boating as indicated by your self it is important to understand this term ' The Rules Of The Road' should not be used in a S.A. context when relating to our R boating skippers ticket as this will definately end up in one big bugger- up this term is used in the states and so on because they keep 'Right' Be careful Just remember anti clock wise always!

"Rules of the Road" (Colregs) is a universal term and applicable to all shipping worldwide. The anti clockwise rule will not in any way help you in overtaking, head on or crossing situations as mentioned by Brenden. In these situations the Colregs must be observed as illustrated in the linked article. It is the ignorance of these rules that leads to tragic accidents on the water.
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#6
Good morning Kingdon, as pointed out above by bassmar, the term "rules of the road" is a term used by all and is found in all shipping literature whether USA or SA is what everyone should be taught that is doing a skippers ticket. anyway I was just making it clear to those that have maybe forgotten and to re cap so we don't see disaster on our lakes. See you at TWK
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#7
Its not mandatory to follow colregs in dams. Rule 1 (a) goes something like this if i'm not mistaken: Colregs applies to all vessels on the high seas, and all the waters connected to the high seas if the water connecting them is navigable by seagoing vessels.

BUT it will be good if everybody on our dams can stick to the basic 'Rules of the road'

Rules in colregs that I think should apply in our dams:
1) In narrow channels keep to your starboard side (drive in the right hand lane).

2) In narrow channel overtake the boat on her starboard side (In the middle of the dam overtaking is not a big problem)

3) The MOST important one I think is to know which boat will be the stand-on vessel, and which one is the give-way vessel. and its important to know what your duties are if you are the stand-on, or give-way vessel.
* STAND-ON: you are the stand on vessel if you have the other vessel approaching you on your port side. If you are the stand-on vessel, keep your speed and course steady.
*GIVE-WAY: You are the give way vessel if you are approaching the other on her port side. Make bold alterations in course, speed or both, so that the stand-on vessel can clearly see your intentions.

4) Keep clear of sailing boats. They cannot manoeuvre in the same way as us.
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#8
Made a quick MS-PAINT drawing for those who needs to refresh their memory
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#9
:roll: :eusa_wall: Ok the way we drive on fresh water dams in South Africa, some of us have higher seagoing qualifications therefore refer to "rules of the road" sorry to all if I have caused confusion.
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#10
Hi Bassmar,
I am aware of "Rules of the Road" (Colregs)
Anti clock wise movement is a right hand movement and this the term is used on all notice boards at fresh water venues in S.A to describe this movement always keep Right overtake Right , head on keep right and crossing keep right (Anti-Clockwise)
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#11
KingDon Wrote:Hi Bassmar,
I am aware of "Rules of the Road" (Colregs)
Anti clock wise movement is a right hand movement and this the term is used on all notice boards at fresh water venues in S.A to describe this movement always keep Right overtake Right , head on keep right and crossing keep right (Anti-Clockwise)

Don

I might be missing something here but how is anti clockwise a right hand movement? If you were to circumnavigate a dam in an anti clockwise direction you would be constantly turning to port (your left when facing forward). Or not?
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#12
Bass_Assasin Wrote:Its not mandatory to follow colregs in dams. Rule 1 (a) goes something like this if i'm not mistaken: Colregs applies to all vessels on the high seas, and all the waters connected to the high seas if the water connecting them is navigable by seagoing vessels.

BUT it will be good if everybody on our dams can stick to the basic 'Rules of the road'

Rules in colregs that I think should apply in our dams:
1) In narrow channels keep to your starboard side (drive in the right hand lane).

2) In narrow channel overtake the boat on her starboard side (In the middle of the dam overtaking is not a big problem)

3) The MOST important one I think is to know which boat will be the stand-on vessel, and which one is the give-way vessel. and its important to know what your duties are if you are the stand-on, or give-way vessel.
* STAND-ON: you are the stand on vessel if you have the other vessel approaching you on your port side. If you are the stand-on vessel, keep your speed and course steady.
*GIVE-WAY: You are the give way vessel if you are approaching the other on her port side. Make bold alterations in course, speed or both, so that the stand-on vessel can clearly see your intentions.

4) Keep clear of sailing boats. They cannot manoeuvre in the same way as us.


Bassassasin

The Colregs ARE MANDATORY on inland dams. You are quoting rule 1(a) from the Colregs. This is the agreement between nations and ratified by IMO. However the regulatory authority in RSA is SAMSA and they determine what regulations are applicable where. If you require a reference then look up "Merchant Shipping (Collision and Distress Signals) Regulations 2005 on the SAMSA sight. Paragraph 4 (a) states that Colregs are applicable to " South African ships anywhere, and other ships when in the republic or its territorial waters" You can also refer to Merchant Shipping (National small vessel safety) Regulations 2007 Paragraph 8 (1) (a).
In future please be more carefull before you tell people that the Colregs are not applicable. Do you have a Skippers??? This is not just a jibe at you but I must say that judging by some of the other comments on this thread I am a bit concerned about the knowledge of the rules out there.

Also your interpretation of the Colregs is misleading and not accurate. If you want to refer to the Colregs then you need to quote them verbatim. For your reference the applicable rules are 7, 8,9,13,14, 15,16 and 17. It is mainly due to people loosly interpreting these rules that we have collisions.

And lastly just give you a bit of background and to establish my credentials in this matter. I hold a Masters Foreign going certificate, Have been at sea for 35 years and a Captain for the last 20. And I suppose owning a bass boat for the past 20 years also counts.
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#13
Bassmar, i respect the fact that you have masters foreign going. Thats a real high qualification. My interpretation of the rules was simplified to the main idea for those guys who do not obay the rules atlall. Ive been to a few boat comps and the clan classic.. ive seen how it goes at big events. No regard for the colregs whatsoever.

I cant compete with masters foreign going, but i know my colregs. To give you my background, i completed s1 and s2 maritime studies with colregs as a subject. I have a skippers ticket and I was the skipper of the jetboats (speeds of over 110kph) in capetown waterfront. I have more than 14 months actual sea time. Im currently studying for masters port ops orals exam im doing in two weeks.

I was unaware of the fact that in south africa samsa made it mandatory for colregs to apply to inland waters. And i appologise for that. But was i wrong on my other points?
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#14
Im not atall trying to weigh up my qualifications with yours. Master foreign going is the highest and most respected qualification in the maritime world.. but im not clueless. Im somewhat offended by the way you adressed me though, but if i am wrong in some way, im willing to listen and learn.

I showed my brother this tread. He was 1st mate foreigngoing and he now is a master port opts in cpt harbour. He had no problems with my simplified interpretation.. exept for the part that colregs does not apply in SA inland waters.
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#15
Bass_Assasin Wrote:Im not atall trying to weigh up my qualifications with yours. Master foreign going is the highest and most respected qualification in the maritime world.. but im not clueless. Im somewhat offended by the way you adressed me though, but if i am wrong in some way, im willing to listen and learn.

I showed my brother this tread. He was 1st mate foreigngoing and he now is a master port opts in cpt harbour. He had no problems with my simplified interpretation.. exept for the part that colregs does not apply in SA inland waters.

Bass Assasin

Firstly let me apologise if I sounded a bit harsh. It's just that I would hate to be run down on the water because someone thought that the Colregs do not apply on Inland waters and as long as they are going anti clockwise all is well. As far as your interpretation of the rules, I think it is safer to stick to quoting the rules as written. For instance the rule states that the vessel that has the other on her starboard side should keep out of the way. Not the way that you have stated. Also I do not agree that overtaking is not an issue in the middle of the dam. Ships have collided in overtaking situations in the middle of the ocean. The rules apply at all times. When I was at Bothie (admitedly a long time ago) we were expected to know the rules applicable to safe navigation off by heart. This was also required for orals.
I spoke to M Viljoen who is a SAMSA surveyor and now principle officer in Saldanha Bay. He also confirmed that the Colregs apply to all inland waters. Read the two regulations I refered to earlier.
Good luck with your studies. Do you inteng going for your Marters FG as well at some stage?
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